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Your Professional Career Box Score

Original Blog Posted December 2020
Your Professional Career Box Score

I would like for all my geology colleagues to take just a few minutes and ask yourself a somewhat reflective and philosophical question. The answer of which may help you to define and realize the goals of your career, allowing you to maximize your professional potential. That question is; “What will the box score of your professional career read like?” Many of you senior geologists that are career focused will have already considered that question and are working hard to fulfill your career and professional goals. But some of you are likely to be focusing on your family, their education, work and many other of life’s demands that all of us deal with. And there is absolutely nothing wrong with that, especially when your children are young and I highly encourage you to make the most of the “golden years of parenthood.”

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Seabed mining: Environmental cost to meet demand for renewable energy technology

AEG Blog by William Godwin, PG, CEG. Past President of AEG

OPINION

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How to Attend an AEG Chapter Meeting

By Phyllis Steckel, RG
AEG Region 7 Director


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AEG Celebrates Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

By William Godwin

This month is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. In honor of the geoscientists living along the “Ring of Fire”, AEG is providing some background on geologic hazards and events that have impacted humans in the Circum-Pacific area.

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Radon Investigation and Remediation

This blog originally appeared on July 6, 2021 and has been reissued.

 

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Be Prepared: Make an AEG Go Bag for Your Chapter Meetings

By Phyllis Steckel, RG; AEG Region 7 Director

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Applied Geologists and Geologic Hazard Assessment

This blog originally appeared on April 6, 2020 and has been reissued.



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Women’s History Month – American Women in the Geosciences

Women’s History Month – American Women in the Geosciences
By: Sarah Kalika

In honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8), I’m guest-authoring this column highlighting some well-known American female geologists and outstanding women of AEG’s leadership who continue to inspire us.

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How Important is Field Work to my Career as an Applied Geologist?

This blog originally appeared on December 1, 2020 and has been reissued.

Of all the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math), geology may be the one science where it is perhaps the most instructive and imperative to do your most significant work outside of an office or lab. As the study of the Earth and its processes, you will benefit greatly from time spent in the field, observing, measuring and studying the movement and interplay between soil, rock, water, environmental factors and engineered works.

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Exploring Geoscience: The Adventure of a Vibrant Field!

The richness of our world is truly astonishing – one need look no further than a university course catalog to get a sampling for this diversity. From studying tiny microbes in the atmosphere to Earth’s reclusive interior to black holes beyond our horizon, the sciences represent the breadth of human investigation into our surroundings. Not only do domains vary across disciplines but even methodology, mode of inquiry, and approaches to problem solving abound. In this rich grove of science, however, it can be easy to overlook the individual nuances which ever draw us to further exploration. It is these subtle beauties of science I hope to share from my short but fervent exploration of geoscience.

The Adventure

While those early morning classes for your degree may not sound too enticing, few things may slake one’s curiosity as much as fieldwork. Through direct observation, fieldwork enables the geologist to grapple with the chaotic mess about us we call the world and attempt to distill it into underlying foundational concepts. Through this process, one must be willing to climb over hill and dale as the urge for discovery drives onward, turning over rocks no one has ever seen before to ponder its clues. Even so, fieldwork must invariably lead to returning to a lab for the inglorious work of systematic measurements ever repeated for accuracy. Thus, it is not merely the adrenaline rush which keeps the geologist at work. Here too, however, is the mystery of discovery, for through meticulous measurement one may draw forth the geologic story like a skillful detective. By these means one may better acquaint oneself with nature’s many mysteries.

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How Geology Affects Your Everyday Life

This blog originally appeared on 1/18/2021 and has been reissued
Unless you are a professional geologist or engineer, it’s unlikely that you give much thought to the science of geology and how it affects your day-to-day activities. However, the study of the Earth’s composition, processes, and mineral makeup is integral to many of the daily activities, products and tools that we take for granted.
Let’s take a look at the role geology plays in our everyday lives.
 

Energy

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Geoscience Employment and the Great Resignation

 

 

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The Top 20 Things Your Advisor Didn’t Tell You


photo by WGodwin, 10.11.14

Your studies and experiences during college are invaluable in preparing you for a future in the geologic sciences. But academic training, however thorough, can never fully prepare you for life as a professional working in your field.

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Balancing Travel, Field Work and Family as a Geologist

The demands of working as an Applied Geologist can be difficult for those with family obligations, especially if your position involves a lot of field work and travel. It can be a bit of a balancing act to maintain a healthy, happy home life when you are frequently on the road.

Bringing home souvenirs is nice, but your kids and spouse would likely rather have your time and attention than a t-shirt or a paperweight. We have some tips for making this type of on-the-go position work for an Applied Geologist with a family.

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Recruiting Applied Geologists for a Small Organization

 

Applied Geology can be a lucrative profession. Professional, experienced geologists will have opportunities to hold well-compensated and prestigious positions at large petroleum companies, governmental agencies and large corporations. It can, therefore be challenging to recruit the best prospects for your small firm over these other potential options.

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Travels in Geology - Arizona


Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest [credit: NPS, public domain]

Continuing our series of articles on geology travel in the United States (see Travels in Geology -  California and Utah), this month we are featuring some of the fantastic opportunities to experience geological wonders throughout the state of Arizona. (Be sure to check on all locations for current visiting protocols during Covid.)


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How to Market Yourself as an Upcoming Geosciences Consultant


So you’ve just decided to set out and become your own boss as an Applied Geosciences consultant. Congratulations! Of course, now comes the hard part, attracting customers. We have some tips for marketing yourself and your new consultation services.

Create a compelling short summary of what you offer.

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Radon Investigation and Remediation

Radon is a naturally-occurring radioactive gas found commonly in many buildings. It is known to cause lung cancer. Because it is colorless and odorless and can easily build up to dangerous levels in the enclosed spaces of our homes and workplaces, it poses a particularly sneaky hidden threat. Structures of any age can be susceptible to high radon levels, however there are certain areas of the country that are at an increased risk of elevated radon levels. Visit the EPA’s interactive radon map to see the risk level in your area.

Radon gas forms in the Earth’s crust during the uranium decaying process. It rises through the surface of bedrock and soil, where it seeps into buildings through foundations and subfloor levels. If the radon gas does not have the ability to dissipate, it can build up and expose the people within to significant health risks. 

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A Road Trip through Rocks and Petroglyphs: An Adventure of Pandemic Proportions

By Stefanie Voss, PE, PG, AEG St. Louis Chapter

My adventure took place in October 2020 and included a road trip to western Colorado and Eastern Utah. This trip came about to visit destinations that I and travel buddy Anna Saindon (also a St. Louis Chapter member) wanted to see for a number of years. This blog is based on a presentation I gave on April 22, 2021 to the AEG St. Louis Chapter on my travel experiences with the geology and its relation to the ancestral peoples, and highlights both Mesa Verde National Park and Dinosaur National Monument. Since I enjoyed this trip so much, I wanted to share it with you!

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Being Your Own Boss in the Geosciences:

Understanding Business Entities, Taxes, Liability and Insurance

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