The North Central Section typically meets the third Tuesday of every month September through May in the Chicago area.

Current Section Constitution & Bylaws
Proposed Constitution & Bylaws

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LINKS ON THIS PAGE:

SCHEDULED MEETINGS

SECTION OFFICERS

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENTS

STUDENT OUTREACH

SECTION SPONSORS

PAST SECTION MEETINGS

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SCHEDULED MEETINGS

April 2014 Meeting Announcement

TOPIC: 2014 Student Paper Competition Night

SPEAKERS: Rajiv Giri, University of Illinois, Chicago; Bala Yamini, University of Illinois, Chicago; Alex Thompson, University of Michigan
WHEN: Tuesday, April 15, 2014
TIME: Cocktails at 5:30 p.m.; Dinner at 6:15 p.m.; Presentation following dinner

WHERE: The Parthenon Restaurant, 314 South Halsted, Chicago, Ill. Phone: 312-726-2407
COST: $35 members, $40 non-members, $10 students and professors
RSVP: Email Renee Wawczak or call 847-519-3430 x429 by Monday, April 14

MORE INFORMATION>>

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SECTION OFFICERS

Chair
Renee Wawczak, (847) 219-0419, email

Vice Chair
Christy Barry, (630) 724-3200, email

Treasurer
Kim Stallings, (630) 506-1247, email

Secretary
Rita Keefe, (312) 860-0149, email

Newsletter Editor
Natalie Ruckauf

Membership Chair
Fernando Monterey, (847) 519-3430 x 442, email

Past Chair
Kevin Richards, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, (312) 596-4447, email
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POSITION ANNOUNCEMENTS

Please contact Bernard Markunas at:

Bernard Markunas Carlson Environmental (312) 899-0658 (email) to place Job Listings

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STUDENT OUTREACH

Please contact one of the Section Officers to arrange for a presentation to students at any level. AEG Members are prepared to present case histories on Civil and Environmental Engineering Projects for college and high school students, as well as, presentations toward Scouting Educational Badges.

Michigan Tech AEG Student Chapter

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SECTION SPONSORS

Cabeno Environmental Field Services, LLC
John Noyes
P: 815.774.3747
F: 815.774.3748
Email
www.cabenoenvironmental.com

 

 

Earth Solutions, Inc.
Beth Luna
P: 630.443.0955
C: 630.362.9833
F: 630.443.0953
Email
www.myearthsolutions.com 

 



ESC Lab Sciences
Duane Hattem
P: 616.307.1587
F: 615.758.5859
Email
www.esclabsciences.com


GeoServe, Inc.
Phil Palsgrove
P: 815.334.9200
F: 815.334.9201
Email


 
IES Drilling Supplies "The Mud Men"
104 East Devore Street
Pearl City, IL 61062

 

Midwest GeoSciences Group
Dan Kelleher
P: 763.607.0092
Email
www.midwestgeo.com





Practical Environmental Consultants, Inc.
Hamid Markazi
P: 847.519.3430
F: 847.519.3431
Email
www.pec-inc.com






Strata Earth Services, LLC
Sara Knight
P: 847.968.4863
F: 847.968.4866
Email
www.strataearth.com


NOTE: To become a Section Sponsor, please contact the Section Chairperson.



PAST MEETINGS

October 2010 Meeting Announcement
November 2010 Meeting Announcement
January 2011 Meeting Announcement
March 2011 Meeting Announcement
April 2011 Meeting Announcement
September 2011 Meeting Announcement
February 2012 Meeting Announcement
March 2012 Meeting Announcement
April 2012 Meeting Announcement
November 2012 Meeting Announcement
December 2012 Meeting Announcement
January 2013 Meeting
February 2013 Meeting
April 2013 Meeting (Student Night)
October 2013 Meeting



PAST SECTION FIELD TRIPS 2006 - Geology of National Parks 

Rita Keefe co-taught a course titled Geology of National Parks in August 2006, through Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU). Rita described it as follows: The course was organized so that if a student couldn't go on the field trip to Yellowstone , they could research, present and write a paper on a pre-approved choice of national parks. The field trip was 10 days long. We left from NEIU in a rented RV and headed west. The first stop was viewing prairie dogs and the Badlands of South Dakota. Then it was on to majestic Mt. Rushmore and the granite works of Crazy Horse. Next we visited a surface mine in Custer where two feldspar crystals ( one 2.5 ton and one .5ton ) were freed by NEIU students the year before. Then, we were off to Hot Springs , S.D. to view a 26,000 year old sink hole that trapped mammoths, bears, lions and wolves. We drove through Hill City and Deadwood bypassing Sturges and the Harley bikers. This brought us to Devils Tower , Wyoming , where we walked its perimeter and contemplated how it was formed. Next was a scenic drive through the Big Horn Mts. and on to Yellowstone . We spent 3 days exploring the caldera called Yellowstone and its many geysers and waterfalls. Old Faithful was right on time. The local bison (not buffalo) gave us a grand send off as we left Yellowstone and drove through the Grand Tetons on our way home. After a short stop at Thermopolis , Wyoming to view the dinosaur dig it was off to Custer to pick up the two crystals which were donated to the university. In other words, we got them in a U-haul and drove non-stop (except for gas) back to NEIU. 
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PAST SECTION MEETINGS

2007 - 2008 MEETINGS

2006 - 2007 MEETINGS

2005 - 2006 MEETINGS

2004 - 2005 MEETINGS

2003 - 2004 MEETINGS

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2007 - 2008 MEETINGS

SEPTEMBER 2007 - Geologic and Hydrogeologic Considerations In Developing An Alternative Energy Source For A Gas-Fired Chemical Plant”

OCTOBER 2007 - GPS & Geodesy: Major Changes in Foundation Technologies

NOVEMBER 2007 - Geologic Effects on the Design and Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers

JANUARY 2008 - Constructing an Underground Freezer and Storage Facility in a Stone Mine

 

SEPTEMBER 2007 - Geologic and Hydrogeologic Considerations In Developing An Alternative Energy Source For A Gas-Fired Chemical Plant

The North Central Section held their September dinner meeting at Greek Islands Restaurant in Lombard , Illinois . At the meeting, Patty Bryan, of URS Corporation discussed how market and environmental pressures are increasing the viability of alternative energy sources to fuel typically petroleum fed manufacturing plants. With natural gas prices climbing, new coal-to-liquid (CTL) technology is being looked at as a possible solution to economic and environmental concerns related to petroleum-based energy sources. The economics of CTL may initially indicate lower costs and greater efficiency, however, what are the geologic, engineering and environmental consequences of using CTL technology?

The project site is currently an 830-ton per day natural gas-fed nitrogen fertilizer plant in rural Illinois . The facility is in the first stage of a conversion from a natural gas fed fertilizer plant into a coal fed poly-generation CTL facility producing "ultra clean" fuels, nitrogen fertilizers and power. After the phase 1 conversion to Illinois coal, the project is scheduled to produce approximately: 920 tons of ammonia fertilizer products; 1,800 barrels of ultra clean, ultra low sulfur fuels Fischer Tropsh (FT) fuels; and, 76 megawatts of electric power for the local grid on a daily basis. It is expected that in addition to the clean fuels produced at the facility, which will double in its overall product output, the plant will produce an estimated 33% fewer overall emissions than the current plant.

Of particular interest are the geologic, hydrogeologic, and environmental considerations of the plant conversion. The project design is based on (1) geologic setting (2) hydrogeologic characteristics (water supply), and (3) potential environmental impact to groundwater and surface water resources. Specifically, the geologic setting influenced the design of containment areas for both raw coal and slag storage on site and for the design of wastewater facilities. The volume of water needed for the CTL conversion is three times greater than the current plant requires. With a projected 6,000 gallon per minute water requirement, a major design consideration involved water supply to the plant. A detailed hydrogeologic investigation evaluated potential water sources including bedrock and overburden aquifers and adjacent surface water, and the potential impact of the increased water usage on water supplies of nearby residents and other industrial and agricultural users.

OCTOBER 2007 - GPS & Geodesy: Major Changes in Foundation Technologies

National Geodetic Survey, Illinois State Advisor, Christopher Pearson Ph.D. spoke of the recent geodetic (datum and adjustment) systems and changes affecting surveying and GIS. He also discussed the forthcoming GPS modernization addition of L2C and L5 signals, Russian GLONASS, European Union Galileo and Chinese Beidou. The future of national datums and adjustments will likely be the adoption of the ITRF 2005 and subsequent adjustments. Chris also described the difficulty of using NAD83 without an adjustment date confounding sensitive survey measurements.

NOVEMBER 2007 - Geologic Effects on the Design and Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers

About twenty members attended the meeting at Athena Restaurant . John E. Moylan, the 2007 Jahns Distinguished Lecturer, gave a presentation of five case studies of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs), explaining the causes of performance problems at three of the sites and reasons why construction was not recommended at two of the sites. The following afternoon, Mr. Moylan also gave an AEG/GSA sponsored lecture at the University of Illinois , Chicago campus. His lecture was about site characterization for environmental remediation. He presented a number of interesting case histories and stressed the importance of performing a separate site characterization study prior to design of permeable reactive barriers. Approximately 50 students and professors attended from the Civil and Materials Engineering and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Departments.

JANUARY 2008 - Constructing an Underground Freezer and Storage Facility in a Stone Mine

Frank Kendorski of Agapito Associates, Inc., in Lombard , Illinois and Tom Boutaugh with Penta Engineering in St. Louis , Missouri spoke to this joint meeting with the ASCE. 

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2006 - 2007 MEETINGS

MAY 2007 - Assessing Groundwater Movement and Contaminant Migration Through Aquitards

 

MAY 2007 - Assessing Groundwater Movement and Contaminant Migration Through Aquitards

The North Central Section of AEG cosponsored a short course with the Midwest GeoSciences Group on May 8, 9, and 10, 2007, at the Northern Illinois University Naperville campus. The course, "Assessing Groundwater Movement and Contaminant Migration Through Aquitards," examined how to better characterize aquitards for environmental and water resource projects for assessing well yields, protecting underlying aquifers and understanding potential contaminant pathways. A total of 65 registrants were in attendance from around the nation, including 10 AEG members, three of which were North Central Section Members. Classroom sessions were conducted each day and a field component at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) was held on May 9. Attendees, arriving early the morning of Day One were greeted with baked goods, juice, coffee, and geology jargon. Classroom sessions began soon after and included: 

Background, purpose and motivation, 
Hydraulics of aquitards and evaluating hydraulic properties of aquitards, 
Strategy for field investigations and instrumentation for monitoring aquitards, and 
Transport through aquitards.



On Day Two, participants enjoyed classroom sessions describing: 
Midwestern glaciogenic aquitards, 
Characterization of aquitards, identifying unexpected field conditions, and 
Stratigraphic sequence at Fermilab.

Attendees then traveled a short distance to Fermilab to begin the field session. Field exercises provided practical application of classroom principles, focusing on characterizing aquitards and their physical properties. The field demonstrations were made possible with continuously sampled rotasonic cores from Boart Longyear Company, direct push sampling from Geoprobe Systems and slug testing equipment and methodology from In-situ, Inc. Participants also observed techniques and field instrumentation for monitoring aquitards including piezometer nests and single borehole multi-level systems. 

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2005 - 2006 MEETINGS

SEPTEMBER 2005 - Risk Analysis in Structural Design

OCTOBER 2005 - Use of Sulfate Amendments in Biodegredation

NOVEMBER 2005 - 3-D Groundwater Flow Model in Buried Karst Topography

DECEMBER 2005 - The Search for Life on Mars

JANUARY 2006 - Calculating Strain in Soils

FEBRUARY 2006 - In-Situ Chemical Oxidation

MARCH 2006 - Hurricane Katrina: Geologic Disaster and Personal Perspectives

APRIL 2006 - McCook Grouting Program as part of the Deep Tunnel Project

MAY 2006 - A Sensor for Monitoring Large Cable Systems for Ground and Slope Anchors

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SEPTEMBER 2005 - Risk Analysis in Structural Design

The North Central Section held their September dinner meeting at Athena Greek Restaurant in downtown Chicago. From Secretary Chris Stohr's notes: "Professor Jamshid Mohammadi, Ph.D., S.E., P.E., Chair of Civil and Architectural Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, gave an engaging account of current considerations in Risk Analysis in Structural Design. Dr. Mohammadi discussed the basic principles underlying structural engineering and use of geology in design beginning with probability and risk. Using equations and statistics, Jamshi showed how probability is used in slope stability, retaining walls, and earthquake-induced ground acceleration. Among these illustrations Prof. Mohammadi calculated probability of failure at IIT based upon ground acceleration from USGS Web site Interactive Hazmaps which determined an epicenter at Sandwich, IL. Of course this raised lively, polite discussion on deterministic versus probabilistic probability, factor of safety, and how all of this is written into international building codes. Best discussion I have heard in an AEG seminar lately."

OCTOBER 2005 - Use of Sulfate Amendments in Biodegredation

The North Central Section held their October dinner meeting at Greek Islands Restaurant in downtown Chicago. At the meeting, Patricia M. Bryan of URS Corporation spoke on "The use of Sulfate Amendments in Biodegradation." Ms. Bryan discussed the application of sulfate amendments to a groundwater plume at a chemical plant, accelerating the ongoing natural biodegradation in both soil and groundwater. The plume is comprised of both aromatic and chlorinated compounds. Groundwater data suggested the plume was under methanogenic conditions and natural biodegradation of the plume had been effective in degrading the BTEX compounds and promoting the reductive dechlorination of TCA and TCE; however, biodegradation has become less effective as the daughter compounds of TCA and TCE accumulated and could not be further degraded under the reductive conditions. A common remediation technology is to increase electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate), specifically dissolved oxygen by either air or ozone sparging, peroxide injections, or oxidant injections to promote the further degradation of the daughter compounds of TCA and TCE and residual BTEX. Patty described how hydrofracturing the glacial materials and injecting sulfate (gypsum) provided an effective and generally less expensive alternative to dissolved oxygen. The presentation was well received and very informative. Enviro-Equipment, Inc., a corporate sponsor of the North Central Section, graciously provided a display of hand-held monitoring instruments for ambient air and water quality analysis during the meeting.

NOVEMBER 2005 - 3-D Groundwater Flow Model in Buried Karst Topography

 The North Central Section held their November dinner meeting at Greek Islands Restaurant and Lounge in Lombard. At the meeting, William M. Green, P.G. of GreenSmith, Inc., spoke on "Groundwater Flow Model with Buried Karst Topography in Miami Florida" following an authentic Greek dinner. Mr. Green presented the groundwater control portion of an Environmental Site Remediation Design, including an Air Sparging/Soil Vapor Extraction System used to remove solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons in soil (sand), and a Groundwater Control System designed to capture contaminants in groundwater that would otherwise be driven from the sparging zone. Mr. Green described how the groundwater flow regime was modeled using state-of-the-art software, including buried Karst Topography of the Bedrock combined with fracture flow. Mr. Green also described how extraction pumps were modeled at different rates to determine the necessary pumping rate to capture contaminants in groundwater that would be driven from proposed sparging operations.

DECEMBER 2005 - The Search for Life on Mars

The meeting was held at the Ristorante Basilico in Norridge, Illinois. The guest speaker was Dr. Barbara-Ann G. Lewis with Northwestern University, who presented on "The Search for Life on Mars" following a fine Italian family-style dinner. The talk summarized the Viking Landers search-for-life experiments on Mars and why results are still controversial. Studies of Martian meteorites and evidence for water on Mars were also discussed. Studies of microbial life in Antarctica and in other extreme life zones on Earth that have been used as evidence that life could have existed on Mars were provided as applicable terrestrial examples. Recent findings of Pathfinder, the current Rovers, and orbital missions were also discussed in the context of evidence for life on Mars.

JANUARY 2006 - Calculating Strain in Soils

The January dinner was a joint meeting with ASCE at the Erie Cafe in Downtonw Chicago, featuring the AEG guest speaker Dr. Lynn Salvati of Nortre Dame University. Dr. Salvati presented "Predicting Small Strain Properties for Soil," focused on predicting the response of soils subjected to both monotonic and cyclic loads. An example was provided of a deep soil site in the Mississippi Embayment having the potential to significantly amplify earthquake ground motions even if there is no liquefaction. For example clays of sufficient thickness >100 feet (30 meters) can act like sands under stress. A simple model that can describe the maximum shear modulus, modulus reduction, and damping of granular materials was discussed and used to predict the response of deep soil sites. It was shown that, although significant improvements have been made in the prediction of small strain properties of soils, there are still factors that are not well quantified, including cementation, rate of loading and 3 dimensional effects of basins.

FEBRUARY 2006 - In-Situ Chemical Oxidation

The February dinner meeting was held at the Greek Islands Restuarant in Lombard, Illinois. The honored speaker was Mr. Steven Anderson of Anderson Environmental Consulting of Downers Grove, Illinois (AEC). Mr. Anderson presented a case history of a site with clayey soils and overlying sandy fill that exhibited soil concentrations of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in excess of State Clean-Up Target Levels. After the performance of a detailed Pilot Test using the injection of Sodium Permanganate and Potassium Permanganate, AEC found that the use of Sodium Permanganate at a 10% solution reduced chlorinated solvent concentrations in soil by 99%. While the use of Potassuim Permanganate at a concentration of 2% reduced chlorinated solvent concetrations in soil by 43%. AEC performed full scale remediation of the site using an approximate 10% solution of sodium permanganate. Althought higher in cost per unit, the use of sodium permanganate allowed for one a single injection event. The material was injected using a double diaphragm pnuematic pump through a GeoProbe at depth, from the bottom up.

Note:

Splash and Spill Hazards exist when using permanganates.

USE CAUTION:

When using Permanganates.
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MARCH 2006 - Hurricane Katrina: Geologic Disaster and Personal Perspectives

AEG President - Dr. Darrel Schmitz of the Mississippi State University Department of Geosciences. spoke to the North Central Section about the state of the association and he presented a review of the geological and meteorological conditions in the Gulf Coast region that led to the disaster that was/is Hurricane Katrina. The meeting was held at the Athena Restuarant. in Downtown Chicago. After dinner Dr. Schmitz discussed the electronic versions of our professional publications, which will provide for increased library subscriptions and distribution of professional articles to the world. Additionally, Dr. Schmitz implored us to donate to the AEG Foundation, so that the fund can support the several educational and professional activities that are within its purview. Dr. Schmitz s lecture on Hurricane Katrina included satellite photography, aerial photography including numerous photographs of Mississippi and New Orleans. Dr. Schmitz s lecture included discussion of the life saving merits of the Global Positioning System (GPS) in conjunction with Geographical Information Systems (GIS). With a loss of street signs and with roads under water and debris, emergency response workers relied on the Mississippi State University Department of Geosciences for Longitudinal and Latitudinal directions to stranded survivors, saving hundreds of lives. A synopsis of the lecture follows: Katrina was "born" on August 24 as the twelfth storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. After raking southern Florida she became an extraordinarily large category 5 (Safer-Simpson scale) storm covering about half of the Gulf of Mexico. Katrina made asecond landfall, the first in the northern Gulf, as a category 4 at Burris, Louisiana. She then made an additional landfall near the Louisiana-Mississippi state line. The large size and prior strength, coupled with the geography of the shoreline, resulted in a record high storm surge. The storm surge affected coastal areas from Louisiana to Florida while spawning tornadoes in Georgia. Katrina's impacts were disastrous. In addition to the devastation by the storm surge, coastal landforms were altered. Some offshore islands are nearly gone, while new sediment has been deposited in other areas. Landform also appears to have limited the inland distance of the storm surge in some areas. Debris deposited by Katrina's storm surge was found inland to the first marine terrace in coastal Mississippi. Having witnessed the second and most destructive to date hurricane landfall along the Mississippi coast, there are many direct and personal impacts described as astounding, amazing, miraculous, and horrendous. Hurricane Camille in 1969 destroyed the Mississippi coast, but even worse destruction occurred from Katrina. Many structures which survived Camille were destroyed by Katrina, primarily due to Katrina's higher storm surge of about thirty feet in western Mississippi. The initial impact along the Mississippi coast was total destruction. Several towns no longer exist. The impact on New Orleans came later from flooding as a result of failed flood walls, that could not withstand the surge forces from Lake Pontchatrain. In northern Mississippi the direct impacts were trivial, compared to those at the coast, but there was damage and power outages over 250 miles from the coast. However, many at Mississippi State had personal impacts. One of our student's parents swam to safety from a top story window in the storm surge. Another student lost his entire family in Gulfport. Most considered the legend of Camille as the ultimate possible hurricane in terms of its destruction along the Mississippi coast. Katrina has now replaced that legend.

APRIL 18, 2006 - McCook Grouting Program as part of the Deep Tunnel Project

This Dinner Meeting was held at the Greek Islands Restuarant in Chicago, with guest speaker Mr. Joseph Kissane who is a geotechnical engineer and geologist with 19 years of nationwide experience in the Corps of Engineers and 7 years in the private sector as an engineering geologist and environmental consultant. He is a Registered Professional Geologist in Illinois and Wisconsin and specializes in grouting, rock mechanics, rock foundation design and coastal erosion protection. His grouting experience includes upland and abutment grouting at Clarence Cannon Dam in Missouri; evaluation of dewatering grouting at Mel Price Lock and Dam at Alton, Illinois; remedial chemical grouting at Wappapello and Clarence Cannon Dams in Missouri; tunnel grouting at Torrence Avenue tunnel in Chicago and preparation of plans and specifications for grouting at CUP-McCook, and other projects. In addition to his interest in things geotechnical and geologic, He has published a book on technical aspects of fly fishing leaders - Drag Free Drift. The CUP-McCook Reservoir is under construction as a storage endpoint for the Mainstream Tunnel System. The reservoir is located between the Des Planes River and the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in the southwest Chicago suburb of Summit, Illinois. The reservoir will be quarried into Silurian dolomite. A large-scale test grouting program was undertaken at the site to assist in the design of lateral groundwater control measures. The test grouting program was undertaken with several purposes in mind: 1. Determine the extent to which state-of-the-art stabilized balanced grout mixes and computer grouting techniques can reduce rock mass permeability at the site 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of grouting to tie the upper portion of the bedrock grout curtain with the newly constructed overburden cutoff wall (slurry wall) 3. Evaluate 2 methods of drilling diamond rotary and percussion used for deep grout holes (nearly 500-feet) with respect to groutability, borehole deviation, production rates and cost; 4. Evaluate existing and post-grouting rock mass permeability to determine the most cost effective approach to managing infiltration and exfiltration. 5. Refine the methods, mixes, grouting layout and contracting details for the production phase of grouting.

MAY 16, 2006 - A Sensor for Monitoring Large Cable Systems for Ground and Slope Anchors

Speaker: Ming L. Wang, PhD with the Department of Civil and Materials Engineering University of Illinois - Chicago TOPIC : Magnetoelastic (EM) stress sensors function by utilizing the dependence of the magnetic properties of structural steels directly to the state of stress. These properties are measured by subjecting the steel to a pulsed or periodic magnetic field, which can be accomplished without any contact. Changes in flux through circuits surrounding the steel allow those magnetic properties to be sensed and deduced through Faraday's law. EM sensor can be designed for all sizes of prestressing steel cables and tendons. It's suitable for measuring quasi-static loads under any environmental conditions. The sensors can be embedded in concrete or fabricated in situ for exposed cables. The sensors are entirely suitable for sheathed cables and require no physical contact with the cable itself. The major contribution of this research is the intended development of a comprehensive testing procedure which can measure the stress in cable sizes of up to 250 (mm) from laboratory characterization of 7 (mm) wires or 0.6 (in) strands. The characteristics of EM sensors are quite ideal for a large number of applications in infrastructure monitoring. These applications include stress measurement in prestressed and reinforced concrete members during or after construction, stress measurement in cable-stayed bridges and in anchorage strands for suspension bridges. Examples of application include monitoring of cable anchors for retaining walls, tunnels, and wire reinforcement in dome structures 
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2004 - 2005 MEETINGS

SEPTEMBER 2004 - Groundwater Flow Model in Sand with Bedrock Fracture Flow

OCTOBER 2004 -Remedial Investigation of a chlorinated solvent plume in a complex geologic setting

NOVEMBER 2004 - Remediating Soil and Groundwater using a Two-Tiered Approach

DECEMBER 2004 - Everglades Restoration program of the Army Corps and South Florida Water Management District

SEPTEMBER 2004 - Groundwater Flow Model in Sand with Bedrock Fracture Flow

The Dinner Meeting was held at the Athena Restuarant in downtown Chicago. The guest speaker was Mr. William M. Green, P.G. of GreenSmith, Inc. Mr. Green presented the groundwater control portion of an Environmental Site Remediation Design. As part of an Air Sparging/Soil Vapor Extraction System to removed solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons in soil (sand), a Groundwater Control System was designed to capture contaminants in groundwater that would otherwise be driven from the sparging zone. The groundwater flow regime was modeled using Visual MODFLOW Pro software by Waterloo Hydrogeologic of Waterloo, Ontario and MODFLOW-SURFACT software from HGL of Herndon, Virginia. The Site model was laid out as a 3D finite difference grid. In order to mimic observed bi-modal Site groundwater flow with a gradient 0.03-ft. across a distance of 49ft. (0.06%), bedrock fracture flow was simulated using drains in linear orientations, in the bottom layer of the model. The groundwater flow rates in the sand layers and the bedrock were both modeled at 32.5 feet per day. Groundwater elevations were maintained in the model to within one-foot of the initial elevations for the 500-day period of the run and extraction pumps were then modeled at different rates to determine the necessary pumping rate to capture contaminants in groundwater driven from proposed sparging operations.

OCTOBER 2004 - Remedial investigation of a Chlorinated Solvent Plume in a Complex Geologic Setting

The dinner meeting was held at the Erie Cafe in downtown Chicago. The guest speaker was Mr. Lawrence Louis Fieber, PG, of Burns & McDonnell Engineering Company, Inc.. Mr. Fieber presented a case history of the remedial investigation of a chlorinated solvent plume in a complex geologic setting comprised of unconsolidated sand and a faulted and fractured bedrock aquifer in San Francisco. He described the tools and methods used by an experienced team of geologists and engineers to arrive at the current conceptual site model, e.g. -Drilling methods and challenges -Bore hole geophysics -Surface geophysics (seismic) at an active airport -Solute transport modeling -Bench scale tests of nano-iron, sodium dithionite and Fenton's reaction -Geochemical and biological natural attenuation. 16,

NOVEMBER 2004 - Remediating Soil and Groundwater using a Two-Tiered Approach

The meeting was held at the Athena Restuarant in Chicago, Illinois. The honored speaker was Ms. Patricia M. Bryan of URS Corporation Ms. Bryan discussed her use of a two-tiered approach to soil and groundwater remediation was conducted at a chemical plant in Buffalo, New York. The plant is located near Buffalo's waterfront and has operated for nearly 100 years. Previous uses of the property included a municipal open dump dating back to the early 19th century. Contamination resulted from long-term releases of various chemicals (including toluene and xylenes) from both underground and aboveground storage tank farms. Both soil (fill and underlying glacial till) and groundwater are AEG North Central Section Fall 2004 Newsletter impacted with very high parts per million concentrations. Contaminated groundwater is migrating downgradient and offsite. The first phase of remediation consisted of targeted source removal. Over 4,500 tons of contaminated soils were excavated for offsite disposal. The second phase of remediation consisted of High Vacuum Extraction (HVE), a soil vapor extraction method. The two-phased approach was designed to minimize the time needed to achieve clean-closure by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The site was entered in the New York State Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP), recently modified to the Brownfield Cleanup Program. Project challenges included: space constraints within the plant; problematic nearby abutters including CSX railroad; high volatile organics contamination in soil and groundwater and TCLP lead hazardous soils. The two-phased approach demonstrates the viability of using soil vapor extraction methods in conjunction with source removal to achieve clean closure under an abbreviated remediation schedule, hydrogeologic and geologic investigations; underground storage tank investigations; Brownfield investigations and remediation; risk assessments, and remedial responseactions.

DECEMBER 21, 2004 - Everglades Restoration program of the Army Corps and South Florida Water Management District

Dinner was held at the Basilico Ristorante in Norridge, Illinois. The speaker was Dr. Jean M. Bahr of theUniversity of Wisconsin - Madison. Dr. Bahr presented A case history of the multidecadal, multibillion dollar Everglades Restoration program of the Army Corps and S. Florida Water Management District. The talk will include a number of hydrogeologically related components of that project, including an Aquifer Storage Recovery System of unprecedented scale and construction of subsurface seepage barriers. Dr. Bahr is Chair of a National Research Council committee that has been reviewing the program and their final report should be coming out some time prior to Dec. 21st. Research Council's Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. 
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2003 - 2004 MEETINGS

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DIRECTIONS

TO RESTUARANTS IN THE CHICAGO AREA:

Athena Restuarant

Basilico Ristorante

Erie Cafe

Greek Islands - Chicago

Greek Islands - Lombard

Rock Bottom Brewery

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Athena Restuarant

212 S. Halstead St., Chicago, IL 60661-5404
(312) 655-0000
Valet Parking is available
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Basilico Ristorante

4701 N. Cumberland Ave., Norridge, IL 60706 (708) 452-6400

IMPORTANT For those coming to the Basilico Restuarant from the northwest using the I-90 who would like to avoid the long delay at the O'Hare toll plaza should take the 190 exit toward O'Hare Airport. Note, access to the 190 is a quick right just as you start on to the 294 south. As you go toward the I-190 you pay an exit toll, then take a quick right on to Mannheim north. Take Mannheim north about a mile to Higgins east (right). Take Higgins east about 3 miles to Cumberland south (right). Continue on Cumberland south about 1-mile to the restaurant which is on the left, south of Lawrence Ave. 
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Erie Cafe

536 W. Erie St., Chicago, IL 60610
(312) 266-2300
Free Parking is available at the restuarant
Directions:
From 90/94 Exit Ohio Street East, Turn left on N. Orleans, Turn Left on W. Erie and Drive 4 Blocks. Erie Cafe is on the right hand side. 536 W. Erie Street 
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Greek Islands - Chicago

200 S. Halsted St., Chicago, IL 60661
(312) 782-9855
Valet Parking is available! 
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Greek Islands - Lombard

300 East 22nd St., Lombard, IL 60148
(630) 932-4545
Free Parking is available at the restuarant.
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Rock Bottom Brewery

1 W. Grand Ave.,
Chicago, IL 60610
(312) 755-9339
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ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LECTURES

OCTOBER 2005 - Use of Sulfate Amendments in Biodegredation

NOVEMBER 2005 - 3-D Groundwater Flow Model in Buried Karst Topography

FEBRUARY 2006 - In-Situ Chemical Oxidation

MAY 2007 - Assessing Groundwater Movement and Contaminant Migration Through Aquitards

SEPTEMBER 2007 - Geologic and Hydrogeologic Considerations In Developing An Alternative Energy Source For A Gas-Fired Chemical Plant”

NOVEMBER 2007 - Geologic Effects on the Design and Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers

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CIVIL ENGINEERING LECTURES

SEPTEMBER 2005 - Risk Analysis in Structural Design

JANUARY 2006 - Calculating Strain in Soils

MARCH 2006 - Hurricane Katrina: Geologic Disaster and Personal Perspectives

MAY 2006 - A Sensor for Monitoring Large Cable Systems for Ground and Slope Anchors

OCTOBER 2007 - GPS & Geodesy: Major Changes in Foundation Technologies

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MINE ENGINEERING LECTURES

SEPTEMBER 2005 - Risk Analysis in Structural Design

APRIL 2006 - McCook Grouting Program as part of the Deep Tunnel Project

MAY 2006 - A Sensor for Monitoring Large Cable Systems for Ground and Slope Anchors

JANUARY 2008 - Constructing an Underground Freezer and Storage Facility in a Stone Mine

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ACADEMIC RESEARCH LECTURES

DECEMBER 2005 - The Search for Life on Mars

MAY 2006 - A Sensor for Monitoring Large Cable Systems for Ground and Slope Anchors